PSYCHEDELIC
SISTERS IN ARMS

A series of personal stories on consent, gender, and sexual violence
against women in psychedelic communities

PSYCHEDELIC
SISTERS IN ARMS

A series of personal stories on consent, gender, and sexual violence against women in psychedelic communities

Psychedelic Sisters In Arms is an ongoing series inspired by women who have recently come forward to speak their truths about the sexual violence they’ve experienced in psychedelic communities, and is indebted to the whisper network that continues to ensure the safety of the outspoken survivors to this day.

This series is a collection of personal stories on violence against women and marginalized people, dealing with issues of consent, gender, and sexual violence. It’s been led by women, and each writer is a member of the broader ‘psychedelic community’. If you have any interest in sharing your story, please reach out to oriana@psymposia.com

psychedelic ethics

Psychedelic Ethics: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Katherine MacLean
I have been deeply disappointed and angry at both men and women in our community who would rather sweep these experiences under the rug and avoid all criticisms that could make it harder for the mainstream to “accept” us and our drugs of choice.
psychedelics sexual assault

Get up, stand up, speak up

Katie Stone
Time stops as his open palm continues toward me, meeting my stomach with force, pushing me back several steps before releasing me.
psychedelics sexual assault

Time’s Up for “Silencing” Tactics

Neşe Devenot
A few years ago, I witnessed the systematic silencing and shaming of Lily Kay Ross for having dared to call attention to severe abuses of power in the psychedelic space. Her extraordinary bravery in sharing her own experience with abuse was met with victim blaming and accusations of selfishness. Key members of the psychedelic research community turned on her for “jeopardizing” the entire field of psychedelic science with her “negativity” and “theatrics.”
psychedelics sexual assault amazon

I Survived Sexual Abuse In The Amazon And Victim Blame At Home

Lily Kay Ross
The controlled narrative goes something like this: ayahuasca is good, and we need to control how people perceive it because this is a controlled substance we want to see legalized, a medicine we want to see legitimated. And if we have to sacrifice a few women who get themselves raped to keep ayahuasca’s name clean, so be it.
psychedelics sexual assault

It’s my choice, but he wanted it more…

Leia Friedman
If it’s not a “fuck, yes!” then it’s not a yes. Inform yourself about systems of power and oppression so you can recognize and deconstruct the patriarchy, rape culture, and supremacy in your thoughts and actions. Listen to survivors.